Additional Participants

Post-doc

Stephanie Henson

Organizational Partners

Oregon State University

NOAA-National Marine Fisheries Service

Project Period

May 2007-April 2008

Level of Access

Open-Access Report

Grant Number

0531289

Submission Date

4-5-2009

Abstract

A variety of extreme climate events occurred during the period of the US GLOBEC NEP monitoring and process studies in the California Current System (CCS) (1997-2003). These provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine a wide range of climate variability experienced by the CCS and its ecosystems. By relating these climate events to regional physical and biological observations, using multiple and diverse data sources (GLOBEC and other recent observations, historical datasets, satellites, circulation and physical-biological models), the investigators will determine how these events affect mesoscale ocean variability and target populations in the CCS. The overarching goal of this project is to characterize the linkages between basin-scale variability indicative of climate events and local changes in mesoscale coastal ocean circulation and structure that impact marine populations, ecosystem structure and productivity. Correlative methods will be used initially to characterize mesoscale variability in the CCS and the concurrent basin-scale conditions during the time of the Field Program and further back where possible. Building on these correlational linkages between basin and mesoscale patterns of variability, the investigators will examine the mechanisms behind these linkages from three different points of view: comparing interannual and decadal scales of climate variability, identifying and comparing different regions of climate response in the CCS, and examining changes in the seasonal signals. From these integrative analyses, they will provide robust indicators of the response of marine populations to climate change, a useful tool for resource assessment and management. The datasets, satellite images and key metrics and indices will be served on a series of Live Access Servers (LAS) and OPeNDAP Servers, which will allow scientists, resource managers, and the public to transparently access, subset and download our data products. Some of the satellite and survey data sets will also be incorporated into curriculum material that is under development within the OSU SMILE program. These materials are used in twelve Oregon high school districts with large proportions of students from groups traditionally under-represented in university science and mathematics departments.

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