Additional Participants


Shichang Kang

Graduate Student

Joe Souney
Jennifer Horsman
Susan Kaspari
Eric Meyerson

Undergraduate Student

Susan Story

Technician, Programmer

Sharon Sneed
Handley Michael

Organizational Partners

Geological Survey of Canada
Australian Antarctic Division
University of Newcastle
University of Colorado at Boulder
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Stockholm University
Southampton Oceanography Center
Paul Smiths College

Other Collaborators or Contacts

Ian Goodwin - University of Newcastle, Australia
Vin Morgan - Australian Antarcic Division
Tas van Ommen - Australian Antarctic Division
Mark Curran - Australian Antarctic Division
Roy Koerner - Geological Survey of Canada
Dave Fisher - Geological Survey of Canada
Curt Stager - Paul Smiths College
Wibjorn Karlen - Stockholm University
Eelco Rohling - Southampton Oceanography Center

Project Period

July 1, 2000-August 31, 2002

Level of Access

Open-Access Report

Grant Number


Submission Date



With the successful completion of deep drilling at Summit Greenland there is now a well-dated, high resolution, multi-parameter record of climate change (response and forcing) for the Northern Hemisphere that covers the last glacial cycle. This record reveals evidence of rapid and dramatic change in climate. Recent examination of the Holocene portion (last 11,500 years) of the Greenland record has demonstrated that, while relatively stable by comparison with glacial age climate, the Holocene does contain subdued versions of glacial age millennial scale and rapid climate change events. The Holocene is also characterized by significant annual to centennial scale variability plus significant and complex climate forcing and response histories. Understanding Holocene climate is essential to the differentiation of natural versus anthropogenic climate response and forcing and to any prediction of future climate.