Date of Award

2006

Level of Access

Open-Access Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Human Development

Advisor

Sandra Caron

Second Committee Member

Robert Milardo

Third Committee Member

Phillip Pratt

Abstract

This study examined the levels of role balance, role overload and ways of coping among 105 working mothers employed at a large Northeastern university. Factors such as employment status, age, income, education, the number of hours spent at work and number and age of dependents were also examined. In addition, women will be asked to rate the importance of several workplace policies. No significant differences were found for levels of role balance, role overload and ways of coping by employment group or by age of dependents. Hours worked per week and number of children were significant for reducing unexplained variance in role balance scores for the entire sample. Education was also significant for reducing unexplained variance for escape-avoidance coping for the entire sample. For only those mothers with children under 18, age of subjects, hours worked per week and number of children were significant for reducing unexplained variance for role balance. Hours worked per week was significant for reducing unexplained variance for role overload only in those mothers with children under 18. Finally, women reported workplace policies that they found important. This study was limited by a small sample size and a lengthy questionnaire. Implications for future research are discussed.

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