Additional Participants

Graduate Student

Claire Gilpin
Behtash Shakeri
Joshua Wright
Stuart Lawson

Organizational Partners

Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
University of North Texas, Denton, TX

Project Period

October 1, 2010-September 30, 2013

Level of Access

Open-Access Report

Grant Number

1040006

Submission Date

9-15-2014

Abstract

Technical Summary: Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry is a non-destructive technique that reveals detailed information about the electron spin interactions in many types of materials. This project will involve a state-of-the-art SQUID magnetometer and Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS), which is a critical tool for characterizing several types of materials currently being investigated by researchers within the Laboratory for Surface Science & Technology (LASST) and other University of Maine (UMaine) laboratories. Specific measurement capabilities include DC and AC magnetic susceptibility, magnetoresistivity, van der Paaw conductivity, and Hall mobility. State-of-the-art MPMS capabilities will be especially valuable to several research programs at UMaine pertaining to (i) surface magnetism in nanoparticles, (ii) magnetic anisotropies in sedimentary rocks, (iii) electrical transport in physical and chemical sensing devices, (iv) optical properties of nanostructures in high magnetic fields, and (v) magnetic nanoparticle based biosensors. The MPMS will serve as a focal point for training undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, and visiting scientists in magnetic materials, nanotechnology, biophysics, and materials science. This instrument is a critical tool for expanding the capacity of UMaine research into magnetic aspects of nanotechnology, biophysics, sensor technology, and materials science. As no SQUID magnetometer currently exists in the State of Maine, the instrumentation will provide access for research projects from interested parties throughout the state, including non-Ph.D. granting institutions and small Maine businesses. The instrument is relatively easy to operate and provides direct information on electron spin interactions, and thus it will be a powerful tool to teach physics and nanotechnology concepts to several different constituents participating in UMaine outreach activities, including K-12 students and teachers, the general public, under-represented groups, and industry partners.

Layman Summary: Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry is a non-destructive technique that reveals detailed information about the electron spin interactions in many types of materials. Knowledge of electron interactions in materials is extremely important in building the next generation of computers, electronics, and contrast agents in biological magnetic screening techniques (i.e. MRI). To gain the necessary information, a system with control over both the magnetic field strength and temperature is critical. To this end, a SQUID/Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS) is ideal for these measurements. This project will purchase a state-of-the-art MPMS system and will be especially valuable to several research programs at UMaine pertaining to surface magnetism in nanoparticles, magnetic anisotropies in sedimentary rocks, electrical transport in physical and chemical sensing devices, and magnetic nanoparticle based biosensors. The proposed MPMS will serve as a focal point for training undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, and visiting scientists in magnetic materials, nanotechnology, biophysics, and materials science. As no SQUID magnetometer currently exists in the State of Maine, the instrumentation will provide access for research projects from interested parties throughout the state, including non-Ph.D. granting institutions and small Maine businesses. The instrument is relatively easy to operate and provides direct information on electron spin interactions, and thus it will be a powerful tool to teach physics and nanotechnology concepts to several different constituents participating in UMaine outreach activities, including K-12 students and teachers, the general public, under-represented groups, and industry partners.

Share