Document Type

Article

Publication Title

Society & Natural Resources

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Publication Date

5-2010

Publisher location

Abington, UK

First Page

489

Last Page

506

Issue Number

6

Volume Number

23

Abstract/ Summary

Across Africa, national policies that established protected areas (PAs) typically limited local use of wildlife and other resources. Over time, these policies have raised tensions with rural communities and today threaten to undermine conservation goals. This article examines community–PA relationships at four important sites in Ethiopia—a country of rich tradition with an unusual colonial past. Using focus groups and household surveys, we found that despite local tensions, most respondents held positive views toward wildlife and nearby PAs. Factors influencing positive views included receiving PA benefits, good relations with PA staff, higher education levels, being older, having a large family, diversified income sources, owning fewer livestock, and fewer incidents of wildlife conflicts. In contrast, the devolved control of PAs from federal to regional levels has not influenced community–PA relations as intended. Our results suggest that relations could be improved through involving communities in co-management arrangements, honoring resource tenure and use rights, providing benefits, and implementing conservation education programs.

Citation/Publisher Attribution

Tessema, M.E., Lilieholm, R.J., Leader-Williams, N., & Ashenafi, Z.T. 2010. Community Attitudes toward Wildlife and Protected Areas in Ethiopia. Society and Natural Resources 23(6):489-506.

Publisher Statement

© 2010 Informa Group plc

DOI

10.1111/j.1752-1688.2012.00670.x

Version

post-print (i.e. final draft post-refereeing with all author corrections and edits)

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