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Description

Two acidulant food additives, sodium acid sulfate (SAS) and citric acid, were investigated for their effectiveness in reducing acrylamide formation in french fries. Acrylamide concentration was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after cleanup of french fry extracts by passage through a C-18 column and derivitization by bromination. At a frying temperature of 180°C, both acidulants appeared ineffective, possibly due to the rapid rate of acrylamide formation, which surpassed the capacity of the acidulants to protonate acrylamide intermediates. At the lowest frying temperature tested (160°C), 3% SAS and 3% citric acid significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited acrylamide formation as compared to the control. However, 3% SAS appeared to inhibit acrylamide formation more effectively than citric acid at 160°C, as well as at frying temperatures of 170 and 180°C. Our results indicate that acrylamide formation during frying can be reduced by treatment of potatoes with 3% SAS or citric acid, but SAS, a stronger acid with a lower pKa, is the more effective acidulant.

Document Type

Article

ISSN

1070-1524

Volume

201

Publication Date

6-1-2009

Publisher

Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station

City

Orono

Keywords

acrylamide, french fries, food additives

Disciplines

Food Processing | Food Science

TB201: Comparison of the Efficacy of Sodium Acid Sulfate and Citric Acid Treatments in Reducing Acrylamide Formation in French Fries

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