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Description

Bioblitzes have become a popular approach to involve scientists and the public in studying biodiversity. They reinforce the idea that natural areas are resources of scientific and educational value and are a way of engaging the public in experiencing the natural world. A bioblitz is typically conducted over a 24-hour period in a targeted area, with the goal of documenting the presence of as many species as possible. Scientists and “weekend naturalists,” along with other individuals who enjoy being in the field, are asked to attend bioblitzes as volunteers to help in finding and identifying as many species as possible. The formal goal of the bioblitzes at Acadia National Park was to once annually collect, sort, and identify as many species of arthropods of a chosen group as possible, within a 24-hour period. Collecting was geographically limited to the Schoodic District of the park, starting in 2004 and continuing to the present. A wide variety of collecting methods was used during the various bioblitzes.

Document Type

Article

ISSN

1070-1524

Volume

206

Publication Date

9-1-2012

Publisher

Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station

City

Orono

Keywords

biodiversity, arthropoda, insects, spiders

Disciplines

Biodiversity | Entomology

TB206: Biodiversity of the Schoodic Peninsula: Results of the Insect and Arachnid Bioblitzes at the Schoodic District of Acadia National Park, Maine

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