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Description

Eastern North America's spruce-fir forests have a unique ecological and human history which is reflected in their current vegetation, ownership patterns, and forest management practices. Furthermore, there are important differences within the region between the true boreal forest and the sub-boreal Acadian forest; this paper emphasizes the Acadian forest. Applying New Forestry to this region will require a modified approach which we outline by describing three basic principles. First, to provide the landscape context for New Forestry, we propose a triad of forest land allocation in which reserves and plantations would co-exist, surrounded by and embedded within a landscape managed by alternative silvicultural systems based on New Forestry principles. The second principle is that silvicultural systems should be patterned after local natural disturbance regimes. The third principle is that ecosystems that have been altered by past practices should be restored. Implementing these principles is discussed in a review of specific silvicultural practices: conservation and restoration of seed sources; retention of residual trees; long rotations; limited whole-tree harvesting; and two-aged stands maintained by irregular shelterwood cutting. At the landscape level we discuss how the triad might be implemented and the importance of size and distribution of harvest areas and riparian zones.

Document Type

Article

ISSN

1070-1508

Volume

716

Publication Date

4-1992

Publisher

Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station

City

Orono, Maine 04469, USA

Keywords

forestry, new forestry, Acadian forest

Disciplines

Forest Biology | Forest Management